Exploring The Word In Colour and Speech

A Synthesis of Anthroposophical Speech and Painting Therapy

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Larissa St
Ringwood 3134
VIC AU
Tel 0061 413 770 020

'Krienol Legend'

The following is an excerpt from 'The Krienol Legend', a story within a story from 'Leaves of the Lady's Green Mantle',written in Kalevala rhythm. The illustrations, painted by Katherine Rudolph relate to the story. These paintings are available for sale in print. All proceeds from the sale of these prints will contribute to the publishing of the book of 'The Krienol Legend', for cultural purposes. Please contact Katherine Rudolph on 0061 413 770 020 or email info@exploringtheword.com.au if you are interested in the purchase of any print or if you are interested in the remainder of the story.

All images are now available in a pop-up image, making it possible to view them in a larger format in more detail, simply by clicking on them. Please note that these images are not always a true representation of the painting due to colour changes and lighting due to photography.

The Krienol Legend

1. Igie Krie was bold and bearded.

On a kind of quest adventure,

Seeking seeds in ancient, wondrous,

Long forgotten land of Krienols.

2. Ochre earth was once transparent.

And the sun was deeply shing.

Sowing seeds was his endeavour;

For he knew the herbs of healing.

3. King Kroleen lay old and ailing,

Not a word, would he now utter.

Mute he came back from the Mudlands,

No one knew the reason for it.

4. Iggy sought the root intended

For restoring words and phrases,

Lost amidst the drooping dismal

Mudlands underneath the marshes.

5. There were gardens 'round the castle;

But Kalayariss grew not there.

Ancients never sowed the seedling,

For they vanished all together....'

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© Copyright 2005 Katherine Rudolph, Exploring The Word in Colour and Speech